01Mar Immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial. Comments are closedPosted by
Acupunct Med. 2014 Feb 24. doi: 10.1136/acupmed-2013-010489. [Epub ahead of print]

Immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial.

Plaster R1, Vieira WB, Alencar FA, Nakano EY, Liebano RE.

Author information

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the immediate effects of electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture on pain, mobility and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

NMTHODS:

Sixty patients with knee osteoarthritis, with a pain intensity of ≥2 on the pain Numerical Rating Scale, were included. The patients were randomised into two groups: manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture. Pain intensity, degree of dysfunction (Timed Up and Go (TUG) test), maximal voluntary isometric contraction and pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after a single session of manual acupuncture or electroacupuncture treatments.

RESULTS:

Both groups showed a significant reduction in pain intensity (p<0.001) and time to run the TUG test after the acupuncture treatment (p=0.005 for the manual acupuncture group and p=0.002 for the electroacupuncture group). There were no differences between the groups regarding pain intensity (p=0.25), TUG test (p=0.70), maximum voluntary isometric contraction (p=0.43) or pressure pain threshold (p=0.27).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study found no difference between the immediate effects of a single session of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on pain, muscle strength and mobility in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER::

RBR-9TCN2X.

KEYWORDS:

Acupuncture, Pain Management, Pain Research

PMID:
24566612
[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]
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